Carnation’s Famous Fudge

November 6, 2009
11 Comments

Fudge1It happens at my grocery store, and I am willing to bet my KitchenAid stand mixer that it happens at your grocery store too.  Every year, no sooner has the store transferred all of the unwanted Halloween candy from the “seasonal” aisle to the bargain bin that the employees start erecting massive sculptures out of common holiday ingredients, which are conspicuously placed throughout the store.

The base of the sculpture is made out of something sturdy, such as 29-ounce cans of pumpkin or cranberry sauce.  On top (in no particular order) you’ll find Chex cereal, alternating layers of brown and confectioner’s sugar, marshmallows, chocolate chips, peppermint extract, etc., etc.  I guess that this monstrosity is meant to represent one-stop-shopping for the busy holiday cook…..except for the fact that no one dares to reach for a low-lying can of pumpkin, fearing that their selection might knock the sculpture down like a game of Jenga.

No holiday supermarket sculpture would be complete without a section composed out of Carnation Evaporated Milk, also known as “The Cooking Milk.”  From creamy pumpkin pie to rich casseroles, evaporated milk is a pantry necessity for this time of year.  I was excited to open an email a few weeks ago from a Cassie, who works for the One2One Network representing the Carnation brand.  She generously offered to send me some free cans of Carnation Evaporated Milk and a gift card to cover the cost of ingredients so that I could experiment with a few recipes that feature evaporated milk and then blog about them.  As you can imagine, it didn’t take a great deal of pondering for me to accept the offer. Hmmm…..let me see…..

The pondering came when I had to decide exactly which recipes I would prepare.  Cassie asked that I make one recipe from a holiday recipe booklet that she sent and also one of my own recipes.  The recipe booklet decision was tough enough.  Not only does it feature more commonly known recipes for baking with evaporated milk, but many savory ones as well.  Since it’s available in regular, low-fat, and fat-free varieties, their evaporated milk can be substituted for the kind of milk that you normally use in your cooking.  Who knew?  I eventually settled on this extremely quick and easy fudge recipe.  Let me tell you, if you’re in a pinch over the holiday season, this is the perfect homemade gift solution.  I mean, who doesn’t love fudge?  Anyone?  Anyone?  Exactly.

As for my second recipe, well, I just couldn’t narrow my decision down to one.  So I made two.  I know, I’m such an over-achiever.  Stop it.  You’re making me blush.  Find out what I made in my next two posts (I’m sure the suspense is killing you.) Here are my extra tips for making this fast (and famous!) fudge:

  • One of the great things about fudge recipes is their versatility.  With this recipe, you can substitute hazelnuts, pistachios, macadamia nuts, or even peanuts for the walnuts/pecans.  Bittersweet chocolate can be replaced by semisweet, milk chocolate, or a combination of the two.  You can also used flavored chips, such as seasonal mint chocolate.  Try replacing the vanilla extract with almond, cherry, or coconut.  Mix in dried sour cherries, cranberries, or shredded coconut along with the nuts.
  • The fudge will keep well, tightly covered and refrigerated, for 4-5 days.
  • If your resulting fudge has a grainy or crumble texture, then you probably didn’t stir it enough.  Stirring constantly ensures a smooth and rich treat.

Carnation Famous Fudge

Makes about 48 squaresFudge2

Ingredients:

1 1/2 cups sugar

2/3 cup Carnation Evaporated Milk

2 tablespoons butter

1/4 teaspoon salt

2 cups miniature marshmallows

1 1/2 cups semi-sweet or bittersweet chocolate chips

1/2 cup chopped pecans or walnuts

1 teaspoon vanilla extract

Line an 8-inch square baking pan with foil.  In a medium, heavy saucepan, combine the sugar, evaporated milk, butter and salt.  Bring the mixture to a full rolling boil over medium heat, stirring constantly.  Boil, stirring constantly, for 4 to 5 minutes.  Remove from heat.

Stir in the marshmallows, chocolate chips, nuts, and vanilla extract.  Stir the mixture vigorously for 1 minute or until marshmallows are melted.  Pour into the prepared baking pan.  Refrigerate the pan for 2 hours or until firm.  Lift the fudge from the pan and remove the foil. Cut into 48 pieces.

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11 Responses to Carnation’s Famous Fudge
  1. OMG, this is the best fudge. It looks so rich and wonderful!

  2. Thanks, Karen. It was incredibly easy too. I definitely recommend it :) Have a great weekend!

  3. Fudge is my favorite candy/dessert/stress reliever. But I can’t make it to save my life. I haven’t tried the Carnation recipe and I have starred this in my reader. Wish me luck!

  4. Haven’t made fudge in forever! I bet Carnation’s recipe is the best too!

  5. You can’t go wrong with fudge! I’m stocked up on Carnation Evaporated milk thanks to coupons and a timely store sale, so I will be trying out some of your recipes – the flan sounds delicious!

  6. Thanks, Whitney! I have complete faith in you. This recipe was really easy, and I predict that you will have some decadent fudge in no time!

    Julie

  7. Thanks so much, Barbara! I always make fudge during the holidays. This is a great standard recipe to have on hand. Enjoy!

  8. Thanks so much, Jodi! Im glad that you enjoy the site. Ill bet that evaporated milk will be put to good use over the next few months!

    Julie

  9. I hate fudge, it always makes me sick! Question: How do you NOT eat it all in one sitting?

    Even looking at fudge makes me sick now, I have no control…..

  10. I love fudge but don’t make it very often since the hubby doesn’t like it. This looks super easy! Thanks!

  11. That happened to me with peanut brittle. I couldnt stop eating it, and it sent me into sugar shock. I felt so ill…..but it was sooo yummy.


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